7 Reasons We Can’t Help Liking Sir Charles Maulver

He only turns up in the village a little bit, but the character played by Greg Wise is one of our favourite things about Cranford…

Greg Wise Interview

1. HE PUTS THE SMOOTH IN SMOOTHIE

Cranford is a realm of busybodies in bonnets, mud-flecked farmer-types, and the occasional harassed doctor. So you can see why Sir Charles Maulver stands out from the crowd. The man isn't just smooth. He's as smooth as a velvet cat. As a silken fox. As a... well, you get the idea. Sir Charles is so darn debonair, he'd make a princess blush with a raise of his eyebrow. We've got to admire that.

2. HE'S A MALE FASHIONISTA

Sir Charles's exquisite manner is matched by the elegance of his clothing. The man looks positively resplendent in his sumptuous suits, cutting a dash as he strides or rides through the rustic landscape of Cranford. It's just as well he looks so massively presentable, as the man's always busy making commercial deals. Well, those cravats aren't going to buy themselves.

3. HE RUFFLES FEATHERS

You know what people say when they see Sir Charles Maulver coming? "It's Sir Charles Maulver!" Even the queenly and imperious "Amazons" of Cranford, who usually peer down their noses at all males in their vicinity, come all of a-flutter when Sir Charles strolls into view, like he's some kind of Victorian pop star.

4. HE CAN BE NICE (SOMETIMES)

Sir Charles is no angel. He's a sly businessman, an arrogant aristocrat, and undeniably puts himself before others. But he does have a heart somewhere in there, and that's best shown when he sorts out a new home and career for his army comrade Captain Brown, who had saved his life during a battle in Afghanistan. (Yes, Sir Charles also happens to be an ex-soldier. There's more to this elegant dandy than meets the eye.)

5. HE'S BRILLIANTLY CATTY

On seeing a lady he hasn't set eyes on for a long while, Sir Charles compliments her gallantly: "What a pleasure it is to see you looking so unaltered." She blushes and beams, and literally seconds after she leaves the room, he sighs, "Dear god, she's lost her bloom." Bad man. Bad, but quite funny, man.

6. HE'S A VISIONARY

Sir Charles doesn't turn up in the village of Cranford very much, but he's actually one of the most important people in the whole saga. And that's because he's an agent of change, of progress, of evolution. His involvement in the railway promises to utterly transform everything, and the locals are appalled that it will allow the "lower orders" move to the area. Sir Charles doesn't mind one bit. He is, accidentally, a man of the people.

7. HE'S DASHEDLY ATTRACTIVE

Oh, it should also probably be mentioned that Sir Charles Maulver really is conspicuously handsome. In fact, Sir Charles has a face so geometrically well-proportioned, he may well have been designed with the aid of set square, ruler and compass. And isn't such a precision-crafted countenance appropriate for a man as exacting as Sir Charles Maulver?

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